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CHAPTER 7: MISCELLANEOUS

 

This page covers:

Section 25 - Hotels

Section 26 - Church

Section 27 - Music

Section 28 - Deaf Children

Section 29 - Language Service Professionals (LSPs)

Click on the links in the left hand column to see the other sections

Section 25 - Hotels

1. I always tell the hotel staff and management that I am hearing impaired and they always agree to come and tell me when there is a fire.  (Editor’s note: in the event of a real fire, staff may not be able to come and tell you as it may put them in danger)

2. I tell staff that in the event of a fire or other emergency they have permission to come straight into the room and wake me as I probably won’t hear the alarm or knocks on the door.

3. I always assume that if there is a fire that nobody will come and tell me, as they'll be too busy looking after themselves. I have a cheap portable fire alarm with a flashing light which I always take with me to hotels. (It was bought at a DIY shop.)

4.  As I spend a lot of time in hotels because of my work I have a Deafgard portable and wire-free smoke alarm. (For information on the Deafgard click on the link: www.deafgard.com )

5.  I have a door beacon which flashes if someone bangs on the door. (The door beacon is available from Connevans (http://www.connevans.com) and Action on Hearing Loss Solutions (http://www.actiononhearingloss.org.uk/shop.aspx)) 

6.  If I’ve stayed in a hotel that has a fire alarm that is accessible to deaf people (i.e. they have vibrating pads or flashing lights, I always praise the hotel.

7.  Quite a few hotels I’ve stayed in have had some sort of loop system in the reception area.  If I stay somewhere where there isn’t one I mention that a lot of hard of hering people find them useful.

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Section 26 - Church

1. I persuaded my church to have a loop system (some churches have infrared systems) for the one in seven people who have a hearing problem. I also got them to display a notice telling other people that there is a loop system. (Notices can be obtained from Hearing Link.) I have also persuaded my church to have an individual, or small team (of which I am part), which is responsible and checks the loop system and ensures that it is working properly and switches it on for services.

2. I ask for lights to be left on during the sermon as it helps with lipreading and ask that anybody who reads, etc, stands in a good light.

3. I have persuaded our vicar to run off extra copies of his sermon for deaf members. Now that he has a word processor it has been even easier for him to do so. It has been the most wonderful help.

4. When our church decided to have a loop system installed I asked that our deaf members of the congregation could have a say in what was needed.  We now have a loop microphone available not just in the lectern, but also in the places where other readers usually stand and also a loudspeaker for the congregation in general.

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Section 27 - Music

1. With my particular hearing loss I can still enjoy listening to music. However I find that the sound of the violin is unbearable. I now buy records which have music played on original instruments, which I find have a softer tone than modern ones and it is a big improvement.

2.  I find I don’t hear music as well as I used to.  When I want to listen to a favourite record or tape I use the loop system that I normally use for the TV.  I find that this helps a little.

3. One person said that they hear music as distorted sound, but they prefer this to not listening to music at all.

4. One person said that though they can hear very little now, they like to “feel” the music when their partner is playing the piano using the vibrations.

5. There is an organisation, Enabling for Music, which helps deaf people to access music through technology. Click here to visit the Enabling for Music website.

6. There are a variety of different environmental aids that may help some people listen to music. I like to use earhooks with either my CD player or my MP3 player.

(Editor's note: there is information on some of the aids available for listening to music in Chapter 6)

7. I like to download music from the internet to my MP3 player - some sites let you listen to the music or part of it first and I use this to see if I can hear it well enough before I buy it.

8. One person said that when they bought new CDs they found it helpful to get the lyrics and read them whilst listening to the music for the first few times. This helped them to "fill in" any bits that they couldn't hear properly.

(Lyrics may be found online on various websites: these are two that the person above has used: http://www.elyrics.net/ and www.lyrics.com. Another site is http://www.lyricsnmusic.com/)

9. I've found that I can't hear certain types of voices very well any more. I can't hear higher voices, so when I'm buying songs I try to go for male voices - I find I can hear these much better than female ones.

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Section 28 - Deaf children

If you want information about deaf children contact the National Deaf Children’s Society.

Or click here to go to the NDCS website.

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Section 29 - Language Service Professionals (LSPs)

Language Service Professionals are people who provide a communication support service to enable deaf people and hearing people to communicate with each other.

Other terms for Language Service Professionals that may beused are Communication Professionals and Human Aids to Communication.

Language Services Professionals work in a variety of different roles. Below is a brief description of what they do:

Lipspeaker - Lipspeakers face the deaf person and use clear lip patterns to repeat what is being said by a third person. They may repeat verbatim or pare things down whilst keeping the meaning that the speaker intended.  You can find more information about lipspeakers from the Association of Lipspeakers.

Manual notetaker - A manual notetaker takes handwritten notes, providing the deaf person with a summary of what is said. Depending on the situation, the notes can be read as they are written and/or can be used later for reference.

Electronic notetaker - An electronic notetaker provides a summary of what is being said. The notetaker uses a laptop computer and specialist software, linked to a second laptop used by the deaf person. The deaf person reads the notes on screen and can interact. It may be possible to take have a copy of the notes to take away.

Speech-to-text reporter - A speech-to-text reporter uses a special keyboard to type what is said, word-for-word, at a speed of 200 words per minute or more. The deaf person reads the resulting text on screen. They may also be called stenographers or Palantypists.

Cued speech transliterator - A cued speech transliterator uses clear lip patterns, together with eight different handshapes (called 'cues') to report what is said. This service is mainly used by deaf children, but some deafened adults have found Cued Speech to be helpful alongside lipreading.

You can find more information on Cued Speech from the Cued Speech Association UK.

BSL/English interpreter - A BSL/English interpreter enables sign language users to communicate with hearing people, and vice-versa. Most BSL/English interpreters work from spoken English, and have good hearing.

Deafblind communicator guide - A deafblind communicator guide helps people who are both deaf and blind to take part in everyday activities, using a range of communication skills.
 
Deafblind interpreter (manual) - A deafblind interpreter uses the deafblind manual alphabet to form letters on a deafblind person's hand, spelling out what a third person is saying.

Action on Hearing Loss has information on the various Language Service Professionals online: http://www.actiononhearingloss.org.uk/supporting-you/factsheets-and-leaflets/communication.aspx

Who pays for Language Service Professionals?

The following is an excerpt from a factsheet called “For Users (Lipreaders)” from the Association of Lipspeakers (ALS)

“Service providers are responsible for the cost of providing lipspeaker support for users of public sector services such as education, health, local authority and the legal system.
Under the Disability Discrimination Act, employers should provide lipspeaker support for interviews, appraisals, meetings and training courses.”

You can view the whole factsheet by clicking on the following link: http://www.lipspeaking.co.uk/fact_users.htm

The same is likely to apply to other Language Service Professionals (LSP).  We would always recommend that you check who is going to pay before booking an LSP.

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