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Chapter 5: Out of doors

This page covers:

Section D: Hearing Aids

Section E: Getting used to hearing aids outdoors

Section F: Rain

Click on the links in the left hand column to see the other sections

 

Section D - Hearing Aids (Out of doors)

Digital aids

1. Some people said they prefer to never alter the settings on their hearing aids.

2. Some people said they turned their hearing aids down because of traffic or wind noise and were extra vigilant and looked for warnings.

3. Some people turn their hearing aid down and others switch it off and remove it. However, with both solutions it is important to remember that you are hearing less sound and you may not hear warning sounds. That means that you will have to look carefully for the approach of any traffic.

4. I find a sheltered spot out of the wind and talk there.

5. Some people said that when they adjusted their aid they checked whether their voice had got too loud.

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Section E - Getting used to hearing aids outdoors.

(For noise issues regarding wearing hearing aids outdoor see section D above)

1. Getting used to wearing hearing aids out of doors takes time.  Some people said that with experience they are now able to get more benefit from wearing their hearing aids outside.

2. If I am with someone I explain that I cannot hear them because of the wind (or because I have had to turn down or remove my hearing aid). I explain I cannot hear ­at all (or can't hear them very well) and ask them if could they speak up and/or I will try to lipread them.

3. Some ladies wear a head scarf to stop wind affecting the microphone on their hearing aid. Other people wear a scarf. However, some people find that something over their heads makes the problem worse because it causes their hearing aid to whistle.

4. Some people have found it useful to wear special covers on their hearing aids. Connevans sells Ear Gear which is a cover for behind-the-ear hearing aids.

ear boots
     

(Editor’s note: Please be aware that there may be a reduction in volume when wearing a cover on or over hearing aids.)

  

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Section F - Rain

The hearing aid should be kept dry to avoid possible damage.

1. I find that an umbrella is better than a rain hood because the latter shuts out voices.

2. I wear a hat to protect the aid.

3. Some people find that a hat with a brim causes their aid to whistle because of the position of the microphone.

One person said that they find that a cap is better than a hat or headscarf, because it does not cause whistling and it shades the eyes.

4. If I wear a hat then that reduces the volume of sound I want to hear and I have to be extra careful about warning sounds.

5. I find that wearing a hat causes my hearing aids to whistle, so I either remove them whilst caught out in the rain or use an umbrella.

6. Some people find it useful to wear covers on or over their hearing aids. (See Section E.4. above.)

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