deaf strategies website

subglobal1 link | subglobal1 link | subglobal1 link | subglobal1 link | subglobal1 link | subglobal1 link | subglobal1 link
subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link
subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link
subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link
subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link
subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link
subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link
subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link

CHAPTER 1: GENERAL INFORMATION

 

On this page:

Section 3 - What should I do if I have a hearing loss? Go to your doctor (your GP)

Section 4 - I don’t think that I am deaf. It’s other people who think that I am deaf.

Click on the links in the left hand column to see the other sections

Section 3 - What should I do if I have a hearing loss? Go to your doctor (your GP)

If you think that you may have a hearing loss it is a good idea to go to your doctor

The advice of audiologists is, if you have any degree of hearing loss, go to your GP.

At what stage should you ask to be referred to the hospital?

If your GP cannot restore your hearing e.g. by removing wax, ask to be referred to the hospital for a hearing test. (In some areas you may be referred to an ENT consultant. In other areas you may be referred to an audiology clinic.)

The hospital should give you a hearing test. You may also be given hearing aid, which many people find to be of great benefit. Get your hearing checked at the first sign of hearing loss.

Do not let anybody put you off, not even your GP

Some GPs don’t believe that some of their patients cannot hear so you may have to insist that you cannot hear. Do not be afraid to keep asking because some GPs can take a lot of persuading. For example, if your GP says “It’s natural to lose a bit of hearing at your age”, do not be put off; ask to be referred for a hearing test.

FAQ: Frequently asked questions about going to the GP to ask for a referral:

FAQ 3.a. How deaf should I be before I ask for help?  Go to your GP as soon as you realise that you have a hearing loss.

FAQ 3.b. How will I know if my hearing loss is big enough to ask for a referral for a hearing test? Do not be embarrassed to ask your GP for help with deafness if one, or more, of the following apply to you:

  1. If you feel that you cannot hear what people are saying as clearly as you think you should.
  2. If you feel that people no longer speak clearly.
  3. If you feel that everybody mumbles these days.
  4. If you are straining to hear.
  5. If you cannot hear in large groups.
  6. If you cannot hear in small groups.
  7. If you can no longer hear in background noises
  8. If there is any situation where you used to be able to hear but no longer can
  9. If you cannot hear warning sounds (e.g. approaching traffic)
  10. If you no longer hear the background sounds you used to hear (e.g. birds, footsteps, and the fridge.)
  11. If you just feel that you are losing your hearing. Indeed, it is a good idea to go if you are not sure but think that you only may have a hearing loss.
  12. If you want the TV or radio or music on louder than other people
  13. If you can no longer hear the telephone ring
  14. If you can no longer hear what people say on the phone
  15. If other people complain that you only hear when you want to
  16. If people complain that you are not listening
  17. If other people start to laugh at your mistakes
  18. If other people start to get impatient or pull faces at you
  19. If you are guessing at what people say.
  20. If you start to avoid social situations
  21. If you keep on needing to lean forward to hear
  22. If you have difficulties hearing during meetings
  23. If you have difficulties hearing in certain rooms

Any one the above may be a good reason for asking your GP for a referral for a hearing test.

FAQ 3.c. What happens if my hearing loss is only on one side? Should I bother the doctor? Do not be embarrassed to go to the GP if you only have a one sided hearing loss. In fact it is very important to go to the GP if you have a one-sided loss. It may not be anything serious but a one-sided hearing loss can occasionally be a sign of something serious.

    Go to top of page

_________________________________________________________________________

Section 4 - I don’t think that I am deaf. It’s other people who think that I am deaf.

Many people who have a hearing loss say that they don’t think that they are deaf. This is because it can take a long time to realise that we have a hearing loss. It frequently takes people 5-12 years to realise that they have a hearing problem.

This length of time is not your fault because deafness often arrives unnoticed. Recognising a hearing problem is not easy. However, if you start having any of the problems mentioned in FAQ 3.b in Section 3 above, then you could well have a hearing loss.

If you have a hearing loss, please remember that you are not alone. About one person in seven has a hearing loss. People of all ages have a hearing loss including babies and children. Also, if it takes you a long time to realise that you are have a hearing problem, again, you are not alone and it’s not your fault.

Once we realise that we have a hearing problem, life can get less difficult and less stressful. After all, if we realise that we have a problem then we can do something about it. For some ideas about the help available, see Section 2: Will anything help me to hear better? Will anything help me to manage better?

Go to top of page

About Us | Site Map | Privacy Policy | Contact Us | ©2011-2015 Deaf Strategies