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CHAPTER 1: GENERAL INFORMATION

 

This page covers:

Section 23 - Own Voice

Section 24 - The Ear Symbol 

Section 25 - Deaf Centres  

Click on the links in the left hand column to see the other sections

Section 23 - Own Voice

Some people find that they have difficulty gauging how loud or quiet their own voice is.  Their voice may seem very loud to them, but quiet to others or seem low to them, but be loud to the listener.

Below are some of the things that some people said about knowing how loud/quiet their voice is:

1. I have problems with the volume of my own voice and the volume can vary considerably with and without a hearing aid. I am losing confidence in gauging the volume of my voice and I'm not embarrassed to enlist the help of a family member, friend, colleague or acquaintance to tell me when me when I am speaking too loudly or quietly.

2. I have developed signals with family and friends. Hand held still horizontally means that I am too loud, and an upward gesture means raise my voice.  I prefer people not to use a downward gesture as it seems rather negative to me.

3. Wearing a hearing aid helps me to use the correct volume when I’m speaking.

4. When I get tired, my concentration is less and it becomes harder to control the volume of my voice.

5. I try to raise and lower my voice depending on whether the background is noisy (e.g. crowded).

6. I watch other peoples' reactions to my voice and raise and lower it accordingly.

7. I practise talking to myself without a hearing aid and then put on the aid to see if I was correct. I try to learn the "feel" of the right volume.

8. If you are worried about your voice contact the hearing therapist and ask to be put in touch with a speech therapist with an interest in helping deaf people. If there is no hearing therapist try to find out whether there is a speech therapist with an interest in helping deaf people in your area. However, in some areas there seem to be very few specialist speech therapists.

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Section 24 - The Ear Symbol            

The ear symbol is often displayed in shops, banks, doctors’ surgeries and other public buildings.

http://accessit.nda.ie/images/dia_etsi_symbol.gif The ear symbol shows that some staff members are trained to communicate with deaf and hearing impaired people. 

However it does not always mean that the person/people who were trained are always available when you need them!  Or they may have left and new people have not been trained.

 

http://www.stoke.gov.uk/ccm/cms-service/stream/image/?image_id=1398295Wherever the ear symbol and a letter 'T' is displayed, this indicates there should be an induction loop which amplifies sound for people with a 'T' switch on their hearing aids.  

You may need to ask for this facility to be switched on.

You need to switch your hearing aid to the ‘T’ setting to use this facility.

The colours can vary - sometimes the background is yellow.

http://www.stoke.gov.uk/ccm/cms-service/stream/image/?image_id=1398295You may also see this sign on some public telephones. 

This means that the telephone should be compatible with hearing aids with a ‘T’ switch.

You need to switch your hearing aid to the ‘T’ setting to use this facility.

1. I always look for the ear symbol in shops, banks and so on. Many people find that where staff do know how to help then they are really helpful.

2. I always go to establishments with the ear symbol and thank them afterwards if there has been anyone there who has helped me.

3. When a ear symbol sticker is displayed it may mean that they have only one staff member trained, and nobody else in the shop has any idea how to help. So it is worth seeking out that person.

4. If the ear symbol is only displayed on one counter, it may mean only one assistant is trained.

5.  One person said, “I always go to the cashier or till with the ear symbol.  If it is working, I give praise.  If it is not working I make a point of speaking to the manager and finding why not.”  I then go back a few weeks later and see if it has been fixed.  If not, I write a letter pointing out that they are not meeting the DDA requirements.”

6. Some people say that they often find that even if a place has a loop system installed it is not working or the staff do not know how to switch it on/use it.  In these cases some people like to let the manager know so that the problem can be rectified to help both themselves and other deaf people in the future.

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Section 25 - Deaf Centres

Some deaf centres cater only for sign language users, some only for speech users and some cater for both.

You may find that you have a deaf centre or similar place local to you where you can meet other people in similar situations to yourself.

1. My Deaf Centre has a room of environmental aids. I have received a lot of help by going.

2. I use my local deaf centre. I like to go and see the latest environmental aids.

3. I go to the local deaf centre for the Hard of Hearing Club.

4. The Deaf Centre is worth visiting as they hold Tinnitus meetings there. I can meet and exchange ideas with others who suffer from Tinnitus.

5. We don’t have a deaf centre near us, but a group of us with hearing losses meet up at each other’s houses once a month or go out for days out together in the summer.  It’s good fun and we have a chance to share problems and solutions.

6. I have been to deaf centres all over the UK.  I found some deaf centres were really welcoming and some were not so helpful.

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